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any info on a Magpie 34

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Created by fretbrner A week ago, 16 Apr 2018
fretbrner
5 posts
16 Apr 2018 5:03PM
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Any one have any experience sailing on one? I noticed the keel is different from the Currawong and the Brolga. How thick were the hulls of the early 80's boats compared to the other Joubert designed boat, the Currawong and Brolga?

A few things I have noticed. The traveller is above the cabin top, which affects the companionway opening. Small little opening. I have only sailed on boats that have had the traveller on the aft of the cockpit and near the companionway, which seems to be better if you are shorthanding. If I installed a Dodger, how would that affect being able to move the boom?

With the traveller being above the companionway, there is no hatch, so the opening is small compared to what I am used to. It does appeal to me in that I would like to go out ocean cruising (smaller opening, less water can get in). Would this be a deal breaker for anyone?

To be honest, the majority of my time would be sailing around newcastle and lake Mac. And down to Sydney and up to Port Stephens but still would like the option of cruising down to Melbourne and further to Tassie and New Zealand in the future.

How would this be compared to a Cav 32? I really like the Cavalier but with kids the extra 2 feet ( Ilike the layout of the Magpie as well) is appealing.

Any info would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

lydia
476 posts
16 Apr 2018 6:38PM
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Simple choice, you want to go on the ocean where it gets rough, get the Magpie.

Bit like a long term owner said to me years about his new 40 footer, "It is the first boat I have had where the windows did not leak"
Of course there where no windows.

Moocher
NSW, 36 posts
16 Apr 2018 9:19PM
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Select to expand quote
fretbrner said..
Any one have any experience sailing on one? I noticed the keel is different from the Currawong and the Brolga. How thick were the hulls of the early 80's boats compared to the other Joubert designed boat, the Currawong and Brolga?

A few things I have noticed. The traveller is above the cabin top, which affects the companionway opening. Small little opening. I have only sailed on boats that have had the traveller on the aft of the cockpit and near the companionway, which seems to be better if you are shorthanding. If I installed a Dodger, how would that affect being able to move the boom?

With the traveller being above the companionway, there is no hatch, so the opening is small compared to what I am used to. It does appeal to me in that I would like to go out ocean cruising (smaller opening, less water can get in). Would this be a deal breaker for anyone?

To be honest, the majority of my time would be sailing around newcastle and lake Mac. And down to Sydney and up to Port Stephens but still would like the option of cruising down to Melbourne and further to Tassie and New Zealand in the future.

How would this be compared to a Cav 32? I really like the Cavalier but with kids the extra 2 feet ( Ilike the layout of the Magpie as well) is appealing.

Any info would be much appreciated.

Thanks,


There's a Magpie 34 called "Berrimilla" that's sailed Syd/Hobart, Hobart/Plymouth UK via Cape Horn for the Fastnet, then back to Sydney via the Northwest Passage for the following Syd/Hobart, not a bad 12 months sailing. I think he still has a blog well worth the read.

Moocher
NSW, 36 posts
16 Apr 2018 9:25PM
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Moocher said..

fretbrner said..
Any one have any experience sailing on one? I noticed the keel is different from the Currawong and the Brolga. How thick were the hulls of the early 80's boats compared to the other Joubert designed boat, the Currawong and Brolga?

A few things I have noticed. The traveller is above the cabin top, which affects the companionway opening. Small little opening. I have only sailed on boats that have had the traveller on the aft of the cockpit and near the companionway, which seems to be better if you are shorthanding. If I installed a Dodger, how would that affect being able to move the boom?

With the traveller being above the companionway, there is no hatch, so the opening is small compared to what I am used to. It does appeal to me in that I would like to go out ocean cruising (smaller opening, less water can get in). Would this be a deal breaker for anyone?

To be honest, the majority of my time would be sailing around newcastle and lake Mac. And down to Sydney and up to Port Stephens but still would like the option of cruising down to Melbourne and further to Tassie and New Zealand in the future.

How would this be compared to a Cav 32? I really like the Cavalier but with kids the extra 2 feet ( Ilike the layout of the Magpie as well) is appealing.

Any info would be much appreciated.

Thanks,



There's a Magpie 34 called "Berrimilla" that's sailed Syd/Hobart, Hobart/Plymouth UK via Cape Horn for the Fastnet, then back to Sydney via the Northwest Passage for the following Syd/Hobart, not a bad 12 months sailing. I think he still has a blog well worth the read.


My apologies she's a Brolga 33!

fretbrner
5 posts
16 Apr 2018 7:57PM
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Moocher,

Berrimilla is a Brolga 33. I know it is similar but the keel seems different, so it may not be as ocean friendly as the Brolga. I know neither has full keel but the Brolga and Cavalier have similar keels. Both are very similar to the S&S 34 and Contessa 32 ( both with blue water pedigree. I don't know if the Magpie was designed more for coastal cruising, while the Brolga was designed for deeper water.

Ramona
NSW, 4090 posts
17 Apr 2018 8:10AM
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Magpie was just an earlier design. All the early 'glass boats have thick layups in their hulls. The traveler on the rear of the cabin tops only real disadvantage is the purchase angle when you want to apply tension to the mainsheet. You have to stand at the front of the cockpit and haul back instead of up with a bridge traveler set up. The hatchway is not a problem and you soon get used to it. The advantages are obvious. The disadvantages are you cant sit on the hatchway entrance and look forward with a sliding cover open to keep a look out while singlehanding. Don't have that bit of extra ventilation while sailing either from an open hatch. Wont need a dodger.
All of Peter Joubert designs are very seaworthy. I have never sailed a Magpie but I've looked over a Brolga 33 and they are a large yacht compared to my Currawong. The Cav 32 is an old design too but I would prefer one of Peter's designs.

fretbrner
5 posts
17 Apr 2018 5:18PM
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Ramona, did the v-berth cabin top seem low to you in the Brolga or was it just me? The Magpie, Brolga and currawong all seem to have low v-berth ceiling height. The Magpie v-berth feels longer than the Cav32 but the ceiling height seems kind of low, which makes it feel feel smaller. But I did six month cruises where the distance of the above bunk was only two feet or so, so I know I could get used to it, and I sleep pretty well in the forward berth. I guess I look at the Joubert designs and the forward cabin seems to stop short of most other boats. Maybe another 2-3 feet forward, which would give port lights either side and a bit more sitting room up front.

Ramona
NSW, 4090 posts
18 Apr 2018 8:06AM
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My forward berth is way too short to sleep on anyway. It's probably only 5 feet long. I use it as a sail storage area. There is very little headroom there and what is is reduced by the liferaft storage hatch. I'm thinking that Mr Joubert designed his yachts to actually sail and discouraged people adding weight in the ends. Especially the bow which is always going to be the most uncomfortable and noisy bunk anyway. My best bunk is a quarter berth, the other side has just a pipe cot. Looking at photos of the previous owners on Syd Hob races they used the settee berths and the cabin sole to sleep.

boty
QLD, 316 posts
18 Apr 2018 2:59PM
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Select to expand quote
Ramona said..
Magpie was just an earlier design. All the early 'glass boats have thick layups in their hulls. The traveler on the rear of the cabin tops only real disadvantage is the purchase angle when you want to apply tension to the mainsheet. You have to stand at the front of the cockpit and haul back instead of up with a bridge traveler set up. The hatchway is not a problem and you soon get used to it. The advantages are obvious. The disadvantages are you cant sit on the hatchway entrance and look forward with a sliding cover open to keep a look out while singlehanding. Don't have that bit of extra ventilation while sailing either from an open hatch. Wont need a dodger.
All of Peter Joubert designs are very seaworthy. I have never sailed a Magpie but I've looked over a Brolga 33 and they are a large yacht compared to my Currawong. The Cav 32 is an old design too but I would prefer one of Peter's designs.


here here it would be my choice of pocket size glass offshore boats including all modern ones solid construction seaworthy design capable of going to windward in a blow and more controllable than the ss down breeze as less stern distortion

theselkie
QLD, 340 posts
18 Apr 2018 4:00PM
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Hey fretbrnr

Are you looking at the Magpie in Mooloolaba?



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"any info on a Magpie 34" started by fretbrner