Forums > Kitesurfing Foiling

North Speedster

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Created by probabli 9 months ago, 4 Mar 2018
probabli
VIC, 22 posts
7 Mar 2018 5:36PM
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North speedsters are priced at about $2300 for the package with the lighter board, which to me seems to be about as low as it gets for a new foil, and there are about three second hand foils online in the whole country.

snalberski
WA, 590 posts
7 Mar 2018 4:38PM
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probabli said..
North speedsters are priced at about $2300 for the package with the lighter board, which to me seems to be about as low as it gets for a new foil, and there are about three second hand foils online in the whole country.


Yes your right, but with the much nicer volume board its $2900, which is $200 less than a full price, full carbon JShapes.

Kamikuza
QLD, 3493 posts
7 Mar 2018 7:04PM
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snalberski said..

probabli said..
North speedsters are priced at about $2300 for the package with the lighter board, which to me seems to be about as low as it gets for a new foil, and there are about three second hand foils online in the whole country.



Yes your right, but with the much nicer volume board its $2900, which is $200 less than a full price, full carbon JShapes.


I'm assuming that's after you take advantage of the exchange rate buying in NZ, but does it include shipping, import duties and GST? I think the limit is AU$1,000...might explain why so much of the gear in the Australian market prices are . . . ridiculous.

probabli
VIC, 22 posts
7 Mar 2018 10:08PM
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That's just the price at kite republic in Melbourne, AUD$2278.

snalberski
WA, 590 posts
7 Mar 2018 8:36PM
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Kamikuza said..



snalberski said..




probabli said..
North speedsters are priced at about $2300 for the package with the lighter board, which to me seems to be about as low as it gets for a new foil, and there are about three second hand foils online in the whole country.






Yes your right, but with the much nicer volume board its $2900, which is $200 less than a full price, full carbon JShapes.





I'm assuming that's after you take advantage of the exchange rate buying in NZ, but does it include shipping, import duties and GST? I think the limit is AU$1,000...might explain why so much of the gear in the Australian market prices are . . . ridiculous.




They are Australian prices from Australian retailers which includes shipping. In fact I just looked and the JShapes is only $2950 whilst the Speedster with pro foil board is $2850.

Kamikuza
QLD, 3493 posts
8 Mar 2018 8:17AM
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snalberski said..

Kamikuza said..




snalberski said..





probabli said..
North speedsters are priced at about $2300 for the package with the lighter board, which to me seems to be about as low as it gets for a new foil, and there are about three second hand foils online in the whole country.







Yes your right, but with the much nicer volume board its $2900, which is $200 less than a full price, full carbon JShapes.






I'm assuming that's after you take advantage of the exchange rate buying in NZ, but does it include shipping, import duties and GST? I think the limit is AU$1,000...might explain why so much of the gear in the Australian market prices are . . . ridiculous.





They are Australian prices from Australian retailers which includes shipping. In fact I just looked and the JShapes is only $2950 whilst the Speedster with pro foil board is $2850.


Aren't they made in NZ? How are they cheaper in Australia? :D

Makes the shapesJ FAR more appealing than the Speedster, if that's what you're interested in.

probabli
VIC, 22 posts
12 Mar 2018 2:03PM
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I bought the speedster and had my first session on it. Wind was super inconsistent and gusty, but was good enough.

After two hours I'm able to ride the foil on my natural tack, but can't consistently ride the foil switch. I think that's because you shoot so far up wind when you're going natural that you have to do a lot of downwind on your switch tack, which is bloody hard. Getting downwind was a much bigger issue than getting upwind.

I had the foil trimmed all the way to the back of the board and the learner wedge in. I don't have anything to compare it to, but that setup seemed to work well.

Someone said above that you should use the same kite size you would use with a twin tip. in hindsight that was pretty terrible advice, I was definitely overpowered and that made it a lot harder.

I read pretty much everything there was to read about foiling before I went out, but the best advice seemed to be from the kiteboarding.com videos (the ones with the hulk figurine). Extremely helpful. Also some random guy on the beach telling me to get as low as possible when riding.

All in all, very happy with the speedster after one session.

snalberski
WA, 590 posts
12 Mar 2018 2:03PM
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probabli said..



I bought the speedster and had my first session on it. Wind was super inconsistent and gusty, but was good enough.

After two hours I'm able to ride the foil on my natural tack, but can't consistently ride the foil switch. I think that's because you shoot so far up wind when you're going natural that you have to do a lot of downwind on your switch tack, which is bloody hard. Getting downwind was a much bigger issue than getting upwind.

I had the foil trimmed all the way to the back of the board and the learner wedge in. I don't have anything to compare it to, but that setup seemed to work well.

Someone said above that you should use the same kite size you would use with a twin tip. in hindsight that was pretty terrible advice, I was definitely overpowered and that made it a lot harder.

I read pretty much everything there was to read about foiling before I went out, but the best advice seemed to be from the kiteboarding.com videos (the ones with the hulk figurine). Extremely helpful. Also some random guy on the beach telling me to get as low as possible when riding.

All in all, very happy with the speedster after one session.


Nice rig! I really like that board. If your able to ride after 2 hours I'd say your doing about 5 times better than most (better than me anyway).
The kiteboarding.com videos are bang on the money for me. Do exactly the opposite of random guy and stand bolt upright whilst learning. Once your more comfortable (which sounds like it might be quite soon) you can start to edge and lean into it a little more. Correct kite size is argued a fair bit but the correct size for everyone is the one that works best for them. Having a kite that you dont have to constantly control and focus on all the time is the main qualifier for me.... something that will stay in the air easily.... same size will work... couple of sizes down will work. Steady non gusty winds around 18knts is a real sweet spot for me. Careful with the winglets... I know of one that cracked.

DukeSilver
WA, 228 posts
12 Mar 2018 7:49PM
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probabli said..




Someone said above that you should use the same kite size you would use with a twin tip. in hindsight that was pretty terrible advice, I was definitely overpowered and that made it a lot harder.




Yes - that is bad advice. If it's 9m TT weather, you should try a 7m. You'll be out of control and scared out of you mind once up on the foil and generating apparent wind. I'm 80kg and can ride a 6m comfortably once it's blowing 15kts. 15 - 18 is nice wind for learning and a 6m - 8m should be about right for you depending on your weight. And yes, stand up when foiling, don't crouch down low.

OceanAddicts
QLD, 347 posts
Site Sponsor
15 Mar 2018 12:24PM
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I agree with Duke and Sal,

I'm 95 kg and would use 7 m Neo most of the time. Smaller is better (for surfing and carving) as you can throw it around quicker. I also find they drift better than bigger kites. If your kite can stay in the air, then you can foil.

I'm also on the page of standing bolt upright. The taller and more relaxed your stance, the better connection/contact you put through the mast and into the foil. Try and imagine your body is an extension of the mast and lean as one with it.

Keep it up though, you're doing great!

Cheers,

Ryan

Kamikuza
QLD, 3493 posts
15 Mar 2018 12:43PM
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And keep your knees firm but supple.

emmafoils
39 posts
15 Mar 2018 5:57PM
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I caution beginners about imitating the small kite sizing that more experienced foilers use. If you have to be working your kite a lot, it makes it very difficult for a beginner to concentrate on everything that is going on with the foil. I think I made this mistake a few times when learning. You want to be adequately powered so you don't have to think about the kite when on foil.

RAL INN
VIC, 2597 posts
16 Mar 2018 3:24PM
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It is one thing to talk about the sizes of kite the advanced riders use which requires a lot of input from the rider and thus taking concentration away from riding the foil.
then there is going down a size or two so that you feel comfortable and not get overpowered once up on foil.
it will be an individual thing as new foilers will find out that foiling tests your kite control to new levels.

warwickl
NSW, 1043 posts
16 Mar 2018 3:45PM
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RAL INN said..
It is one thing to talk about the sizes of kite the advanced riders use which requires a lot of input from the rider and thus taking concentration away from riding the foil.
then there is going down a size or two so that you feel comfortable and not get overpowered once up on foil.
it will be an individual thing as new foilers will find out that foiling tests your kite control to new levels.



I agree with you on this one.
Kite size also depends on wing size and design Imo - as usual many factors.
I like to fiddle with things and tune to my requirements.
Currently my favourite is Zeeko with Carver wing plus shim under the stabliser wing, 90 cm mast mounted on a skim board with a front foot strap. This set up has made on foil jibing in my natural direction easy.


Brohan
VIC, 505 posts
16 Mar 2018 5:31PM
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I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.

warwickl
NSW, 1043 posts
16 Mar 2018 6:31PM
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Select to expand quote
Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.


My short 12 months experience indicates if too much pressure on one foot there is either wrong foot placement and/or aoa of wing tuning.
I had too much back foot pressure and subsequently control. This could be down to foot placement but turned out back wing tuning for me.
In your case with excessive front foot issues try a very thin shim under front of the back wing.
Restating - I am no expert but these subtle adjustments are working for me. No leg/knee issues now as a result of this fine tuning and I am 71 with 2 hr sessions 3 to 4 times per week.

Livit
WA, 392 posts
16 Mar 2018 9:21PM
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Brohan said..

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.



Did you check that the tracks on your KFA board match the recommended position of the Speedster? It may be the case that the speedster require the tracks to be placed further back and in that case getting an adequate board could solve the problem.

weebitbreezy
357 posts
16 Mar 2018 9:37PM
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Select to expand quote
Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.


I'd be interested in a bigger review. Learning to stick one on a Shinn Stubbo so interested in foil placements for positioning as well. Have north published their foot positions/mast track positioning?

Were you riding with the 'beginner shim' in? From what I understand that makes it fly much earlier. I can understand that resulting in a lot of front foot pressure as you would be going a lot faster than the average learner.

TomW059
175 posts
17 Mar 2018 4:51AM
Thumbs Up

You don't say if you are riding strapless or strapped of with foothooks .
You need to spend more hours on the board adjusting your rear and front foot position.
I was also online asking tons of questions first 10 hours of riding .
You just have to go out and keep riding . Put away your other boards . Just ride the Hf.
I'm 70 hours in, and now doing gybes and riding foil with proficiency .
I think I need another 700 hours.

Brohan
VIC, 505 posts
17 Mar 2018 8:17AM
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Select to expand quote
TomW059 said..
You don't say if you are riding strapless or strapped of with foothooks .
You need to spend more hours on the board adjusting your rear and front foot position.
I was also online asking tons of questions first 10 hours of riding .
You just have to go out and keep riding . Put away your other boards . Just ride the Hf.
I'm 70 hours in, and now doing gybes and riding foil with proficiency .
I think I need another 700 hours.



Select to expand quote
weebitbreezy said..

Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.



I'd be interested in a bigger review. Learning to stick one on a Shinn Stubbo so interested in foil placements for positioning as well. Have north published their foot positions/mast track positioning?

Were you riding with the 'beginner shim' in? From what I understand that makes it fly much earlier. I can understand that resulting in a lot of front foot pressure as you would be going a lot faster than the average learner.




Select to expand quote
Livit said..

Brohan said..

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.




Did you check that the tracks on your KFA board match the recommended position of the Speedster? It may be the case that the speedster require the tracks to be placed further back and in that case getting an adequate board could solve the problem.




Select to expand quote
warwickl said..

Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.



My short 12 months experience indicates if too much pressure on one foot there is either wrong foot placement and/or aoa of wing tuning.
I had too much back foot pressure and subsequently control. This could be down to foot placement but turned out back wing tuning for me.
In your case with excessive front foot issues try a very thin shim under front of the back wing.
Restating - I am no expert but these subtle adjustments are working for me. No leg/knee issues now as a result of this fine tuning and I am 71 with 2 hr sessions 3 to 4 times per week.



All valid points about the KFA rails in relation to the foil, I'll check that out. I have it as far back as I can so I might have to look at a new board.

I've tried it with the beginner shim and honestly didn't notice any difference in performance or required front foot pressure. I don't think it's my foot position but I'll make a mental note about it next time I'm out on the foil, I've ridden it both strapped and strapless and have played around a bit with my foot placement.

How would you tune the back wing? I'll write a more in depth review later this week.

eddiemorgs
NT, 334 posts
17 Mar 2018 11:15AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Brohan said..

TomW059 said..
You don't say if you are riding strapless or strapped of with foothooks .
You need to spend more hours on the board adjusting your rear and front foot position.
I was also online asking tons of questions first 10 hours of riding .
You just have to go out and keep riding . Put away your other boards . Just ride the Hf.
I'm 70 hours in, and now doing gybes and riding foil with proficiency .
I think I need another 700 hours.





weebitbreezy said..


Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.




I'd be interested in a bigger review. Learning to stick one on a Shinn Stubbo so interested in foil placements for positioning as well. Have north published their foot positions/mast track positioning?

Were you riding with the 'beginner shim' in? From what I understand that makes it fly much earlier. I can understand that resulting in a lot of front foot pressure as you would be going a lot faster than the average learner.






Livit said..


Brohan said..

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.





Did you check that the tracks on your KFA board match the recommended position of the Speedster? It may be the case that the speedster require the tracks to be placed further back and in that case getting an adequate board could solve the problem.






warwickl said..


Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.




My short 12 months experience indicates if too much pressure on one foot there is either wrong foot placement and/or aoa of wing tuning.
I had too much back foot pressure and subsequently control. This could be down to foot placement but turned out back wing tuning for me.
In your case with excessive front foot issues try a very thin shim under front of the back wing.
Restating - I am no expert but these subtle adjustments are working for me. No leg/knee issues now as a result of this fine tuning and I am 71 with 2 hr sessions 3 to 4 times per week.




All valid points about the KFA rails in relation to the foil, I'll check that out. I have it as far back as I can so I might have to look at a new board.

I've tried it with the beginner shim and honestly didn't notice any difference in performance or required front foot pressure. I don't think it's my foot position but I'll make a mental note about it next time I'm out on the foil, I've ridden it both strapped and strapless and have played around a bit with my foot placement.

How would you tune the back wing? I'll write a more in depth review later this week.


Bearing in mind my main experience is with jshapes cruzer ( beginner / wave ) and freestyle foils .
Positioning for each is quite different ... cruzer more even balance between front and back and quicker to foil / easier to ride ( I just love this thing ) , the freestyle requires less front pressure , more board speed to foil , more reactive to underwater movement and tracks better but trickier to ride .

Relating that to 20 mins on the speedster foil . With the beginner shim in .
Less front pressure than both the above( kind of surprised about what Brohan says about front pressure - I was looking for more ) , more board speed needed than a low aspect foil ( which is ok as when you are learning , I think its good to have some forward motion happening before you foil , as opposed to foil straight away once you are up .. you have a bit of time to get kite and body sorted before you are thinking about the foil )

Not as loose and "wavey " like the cruzer or say a cab double agent , tracks a little like the jshapes freestyle foil which has a more anhedral wing setup than both of the others

I thought it was very easy and forgiving to ride .

But still look for my jshapes every time I ride a different brand
OK , doesn't have all the adjustable bells and whistles , but it works beautifully

eddiemorgs
NT, 334 posts
17 Mar 2018 11:15AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Brohan said..

TomW059 said..
You don't say if you are riding strapless or strapped of with foothooks .
You need to spend more hours on the board adjusting your rear and front foot position.
I was also online asking tons of questions first 10 hours of riding .
You just have to go out and keep riding . Put away your other boards . Just ride the Hf.
I'm 70 hours in, and now doing gybes and riding foil with proficiency .
I think I need another 700 hours.





weebitbreezy said..


Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.




I'd be interested in a bigger review. Learning to stick one on a Shinn Stubbo so interested in foil placements for positioning as well. Have north published their foot positions/mast track positioning?

Were you riding with the 'beginner shim' in? From what I understand that makes it fly much earlier. I can understand that resulting in a lot of front foot pressure as you would be going a lot faster than the average learner.






Livit said..


Brohan said..

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.





Did you check that the tracks on your KFA board match the recommended position of the Speedster? It may be the case that the speedster require the tracks to be placed further back and in that case getting an adequate board could solve the problem.






warwickl said..


Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.




My short 12 months experience indicates if too much pressure on one foot there is either wrong foot placement and/or aoa of wing tuning.
I had too much back foot pressure and subsequently control. This could be down to foot placement but turned out back wing tuning for me.
In your case with excessive front foot issues try a very thin shim under front of the back wing.
Restating - I am no expert but these subtle adjustments are working for me. No leg/knee issues now as a result of this fine tuning and I am 71 with 2 hr sessions 3 to 4 times per week.




All valid points about the KFA rails in relation to the foil, I'll check that out. I have it as far back as I can so I might have to look at a new board.

I've tried it with the beginner shim and honestly didn't notice any difference in performance or required front foot pressure. I don't think it's my foot position but I'll make a mental note about it next time I'm out on the foil, I've ridden it both strapped and strapless and have played around a bit with my foot placement.

How would you tune the back wing? I'll write a more in depth review later this week.


Bearing in mind my main experience is with jshapes cruzer ( beginner / wave ) and freestyle foils .
Positioning for each is quite different ... cruzer more even balance between front and back and quicker to foil / easier to ride ( I just love this thing ) , the freestyle requires less front pressure , more board speed to foil , more reactive to underwater movement and tracks better but trickier to ride .

Relating that to 20 mins on the speedster foil . With the beginner shim in .
Less front pressure than both the above( kind of surprised about what Brohan says about front pressure - I was looking for more ) , more board speed needed than a low aspect foil ( which is ok as when you are learning , I think its good to have some forward motion happening before you foil , as opposed to foil straight away once you are up .. you have a bit of time to get kite and body sorted before you are thinking about the foil )

Not as loose and "wavey " like the cruzer or say a cab double agent , tracks a little like the jshapes freestyle foil which has a more anhedral wing setup than both of the others

I thought it was very easy and forgiving to ride .

But still look for my jshapes every time I ride a different brand
OK , doesn't have all the adjustable bells and whistles , but it works beautifully

Livit
WA, 392 posts
17 Mar 2018 11:27AM
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weebitbreezy said..



Have north published their foot positions/mast track positioning?




If they haven't, maybe the OP Probabli can measure the distance between the front of his tracks and the first insert position of the front footstrap? For sure North would have worked out the optimum position on their own board.

probabli
VIC, 22 posts
18 Mar 2018 3:21AM
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Livit said..



weebitbreezy said..




Have north published their foot positions/mast track positioning?





If they haven't, maybe the OP Probabli can measure the distance between the front of his tracks and the first insert position of the front footstrap? For sure North would have worked out the optimum position on their own board.


I'm away so can't measure at the moment, but with five foot strap positions and several inches of tracks for the foil, its a massive range.

I have the foil set right to the back and the footstraps set right to the front. I'm a bigger guy, but that seems to be the default learning position anyway.

ice
VIC, 208 posts
20 Mar 2018 11:56AM
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OceanAddicts said..
If your kite can stay in the air, then you can foil.


I have seen this written several times but it is not true for me.

In 10 knots of wind, I can fly my 14m LEI, and also my 7m LEI. However I have no chance of getting the 7m to foil at that wind speed.

Kamikuza
QLD, 3493 posts
20 Mar 2018 8:11PM
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ice said..

OceanAddicts said..
If your kite can stay in the air, then you can foil.



I have seen this written several times but it is not true for me.

In 10 knots of wind, I can fly my 14m LEI, and also my 7m LEI. However I have no chance of getting the 7m to foil at that wind speed.


If they sit at the zenith well behaved, you're good to go. If you can't walk without fighting to keep them in the air, you're going to have a hard time. Like, "promoting a new brand on SB" hard time.

Might be technique, or maybe try longer lines.

For example, going to the left: start with a power stroke deep in the window to get your out of the water, a quick stroke back to 1 o'clock to get you on the foil, then another stroke deep to build foiling speed... The other thing you can try is start with the kite well off to the side, the board on your feet and square to the kite, then a deep stroke downwind and go straight onto the foil. I find the timing to be critical for the second technique, so it's more difficult.

And then sometimes you just have to wang the kite all across the sky to put some tension in the lines and pray for enough wind to get out of the water :D

DukeSilver
WA, 228 posts
20 Mar 2018 6:49PM
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Select to expand quote
ice said..

OceanAddicts said..
If your kite can stay in the air, then you can foil.



I have seen this written several times but it is not true for me.

In 10 knots of wind, I can fly my 14m LEI, and also my 7m LEI. However I have no chance of getting the 7m to foil at that wind speed.


I've never read that rule of thumb before and I think it is overstating things somewhat. The saying I have read quite a few times and, from experience, believe is mostly accurate, is "if there is enough wind to water start, you can foil".

warwickl
NSW, 1043 posts
1 Apr 2018 6:14PM
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Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.



Select to expand quote
Brohan said..
I think the North Speedster is a very good beginner foil. I've ridden carbon foils and have had a Blue Zeeko foil. I've progressed the most on my North foil as before I had the speedster, I wasn't able to change direction or keep on the foil for a long period of time.

I originally had a blue Zeeko foil 1-2 years ago and wasn't really a fan, I gave up foiling for over a year until I found a very cheap KFA Mako. That lasted a day before the sea claimed it and it was never seen again.

What drew me to the North speedster was the price (a few $100 cheaper then the others), weight and the look. My first go I was up and going as normal, I could also ride toe side comfortably after a few tries.

The only thing I don't like about the North Speedster is the amount of front foot pressure required, I have it as far back as it can go on my KFA board and it still requires a lot of pressure. It also feels a bit slow but I clocked myself reaching around 32-35kms, a more experienced foiler might be able to get a little more out of it.

Happy to write a more in depth review if needed.


Just wonering about durability of the North?
Plus what is the wing area?

probabli
VIC, 22 posts
7 May 2018 3:58PM
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Just wonering about durability of the North?
Plus what is the wing area?


I've hit the ground a few times on the foil, nothing crazy, but can honestly say i have no concerns at all about the durability. The composite that the foil is made out of feels bullet proof to me. I said in another thread that the knock on it seems to be the flexibility of the foil because it is not as stiff as pure carbon fibre.

This guy (yes a north rep) slams the foil on the ground in his shop several times to test it out -
.

I still highly recommend the speedster, and the new wing without the winglet looks even better i reckon.



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"North Speedster" started by probabli